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corrugated metal fence

corrugated metal fence update part 4

corrugated metal fenceHello everyone, here’s a summertime update of my corrugated metal fence built in 2013. The front of the fence includes tin ceiling tiles (purchased new and painted) and corrugated steel cut to fit into the fence in squares. The other three sides are sheets of corrugated metal. The whole fence has redwood posts and rails.
corrugated metal fenceThe aging process has been fun to watch, water in the form of rain, snow and sprinklers has brought out the rust in pleasing ways.

corrugated metal fence

corrugated metal fence

backyard shipping containerMy kids have added a skate ramp, just inside the gate, basically covering up one of my gate doors.

corrugated metal fence
metal ceiling tile fenceIn any spot where the paint has chipped off the ceiling tiles, the rusting process begins immediately (see above picture). Good thing I like the rusty, aged look.
corrugated metal fenceThe tin ceiling tiles began to rust immediately, the corrugated steel has taken much longer. It’s barely rusted at all in areas where very little water hits the fence.

The wood has been stained 3 times over the years, at the rate of about every other year. If you looks closely, you can see where the metal close to the wood is less rusty and has been protected by the stain applied hurriedly by indentured, distracted, yet hard working teens.
corrugated metal fenceI’ve always planned to make a tiny door for this opening within the big gate. It’s been low priority since we don’t have an animals that need to be contained, and as you can see-  it’s still yet to be built.
metal ceiling tile fence After the gates were trashed in a wind storm (heavy winds happen frequently) I added the metal strapping to the backside of the gates. Best idea ever. The strapping saved the day, the gates are holding up great now. The only true weathering or warping is happening with the wooden elements.  We don’t open the gates very often (2-3 times a summer) which probably helps keep them strong. When the gates are open, for as short a time as possible, we prop them up on blocks to support them on the sloping driveway.

backyard shipping containerWe put a shipping container in the side yard for storage, hanging out or both. It goes well with the metal fence surrounding it. We love the aesthetic and the extra space.
corrugated metal fence
<a href="http://noelleodesigns.com/?attachment_id=9853" rel="attachment wp-att-9853"><img class="aligncenter size-large wp-image-9853" src="http://noelleodesigns.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/IMG_2554-1024x768.jpg" alt="backyard shipping container" width="625" height="469" /></a>We put a shipping container in the side yard for storage, hanging out or both. It goes well with the metal fence surrounding it. We love the aesthetic and the extra space.
corrugated metal fenceIn the other corner of the yard we put in a wooden pergola. Originally, there was a beautiful mountain view from this corner but then a neighboring house went in and blocked that view. The new house also blocks the strong winds that come from that direction. And the neighbors are really great, so we’ll take the trade off.

corrugated metal fencecorrugated metal fence
corrugated metal fence Even in the 5 years or so the metal has been exposed to the elements, very little rust shows in the areas not directly hit by the sprinklers, like this pergola corner.
corrugated metal fenceTo the right of the baby, follow the gravel path past the shed to the garden area on the south side of the house.
corrugated metal fenceOn the south side of the house are the raised beds garden spot. Corrugated plastic panels on two sections help let more light in.
corrugated metal fenceAs you can see, the non-painted sides of the tiles are very rusted. It will eventually rust through, much quicker (maybe 10 years)  than the corrugated metal (maybe 100 years). The galvanized metal hardware is still looking good.
corrugated metal fenceI was very skeptical about this corrugated plastic. I had nightmares of it turning yellow and breaking like I’ve remembered seeing at elderly houses throughout my life. But I really wanted as much sunlight as possible in this garden area. Since it’s basically invisible to both our neighbors and ourselves, no one spends time or is worried about the ‘look’ of things on this side of the house, we decided to go with the clear, weird corrugated plastic. As you can see- no yellow, no breaks and the garden grows well- I would do it again!
corrugated metal fenceThe tin ceiling tiles I bought had an extra flange on all sides. This worked in my favor as I bent them in on all sides and screwed right through the flange into the wood to hold the tiles in place. The tin tiles are also easy to cut and bend for fitting in smaller areas.

corrugated metal fenceThe view from the front of the house, on the garden side. As you can see, the only real wear is with the wood elements. Even with the treated redwood I hand-selected, there is still warping and twisting of the wood elements. That’s the nature of wood. As you can see, we wedged a 2 x 4 above the gate to keep the post on the right to keep from bending in, the wedged piece of wood has never fallen out.

corrugated metal fence corrugated metal fence corrugated metal fence

To view the building of the fence in 2013- Part 1.

To view the 2014 fence update- Part 2.

To view the 2015 fence update- Part 3.

corrugated metal fence update part 2

corrugated metal fenceThe backyard progress, part 3– the back 3 sides of my corrugated metal fence are now finally finished.

backyard shipping containerThe shipping container is also in place but yet to be cut into to add doors and windows.

corrugated metal fenceThe fence was build with wooden posts, 8 ft. apart, set directly into concrete. Wooden rails are held between the posts, with metal building brackets.

corrugated metal fenceThe metal we used is non-galvanized corrugated metal. Non-galvanized  meaning it will rust and with a thickness of 26 gauge. It’s actually more expensive than galvanized (won’t rust) corrugated metal which is 22 gauge, thinner, and flimsier. The galvanized seemed very shiny, reflective and contrived, if that makes sense. I was told you can remove the galvanized layer with music acid, and allow it to rust, but due to the thin-ness of the material, it will rust all the way through in about 10 years. We decided it was worth the extra expense to go with the non galvanized metal and get the rusty, organic look.

metal fence, wood postsI like the look of the wood with the metal so I built the fence with the rails on the inside. We just stained the wood and it looks even nicer. I think it will look even better as the fence starts to rust.

metal fence, wood postsThese corrugated panels have been up for about 3 months and have just barely begun to rust. I did spray the entire fence with the hose, about a week ago, with the hope of speeding up the rusting process, but honestly I’m enjoying the way it looks now.

corrugated fenceJust the beginnings of rust starting to show, after a few rain storms and a spraying with the hose.

tiny door in metal fenceOn the back corner of the fence, where the kid traffic is the heaviest, we have left a tiny door panel. I have a door (piece of corrugated) made for it but haven’t gotten it put up yet. It will be hinged into the post and on a spring so it stays closed when not in use.  Also, you can see the overlapping of the panels. Each 8 ft. section took 3 pieces of corrugated, instead of cutting them to width, I just let the panels overlap each other and screwed them into the rails, with a pilot hole, and 1 5/8″ sheet metal screws.

tin ceiling tile metal fenceOn the south side of the house, the space was fairly narrow, I put in raised beds but the beds were going to be too close to the fence to get enough sunlight to grow vegetables. After puzzling it over for months, I decided to put up clear corrugated plastic panels to let enough light through to keep my vegetables growing. These improved plastic panels shouldn’t get brittle and weird yellow like the plastic you remember on your grandma’s greenhouse.

raised garden bedsThe view from the front yard, looking through the gate and into the garden area.

tin ceiling tile fence, backThe backside of the fancy fence panel, the tin is quite rusty after 8 months of exposure.

clear garden, metal fenceThe view from the sidewalk, across the empty neighboring lot.

corrugated metal fenceHere is what the fence looks like from the outside, only the posts are visible from this view. You can see the retaining wall that we put in to maximize space and flatten out the backyard.

garden backyard areaThe garden beds from the inside of the fence, as you can see there’s a lot more light with the clear panels than there would be with metal in place. Also, you can see the backside weathering of the tin and corrugated panels from the fancy  front-of-the-house part of the fence. Pause and take a nostalgic glimpse at our art covered garden fence at our previous house.

clear garden fenceThe tin ceiling tiles rusted a lot faster than the corrugated, I’m loving the backside non-painted look.

fancy metal fence, backThe corrugated is rusting much slower, taking it’s time in the weathering process, but it’s a nice contrast.

fancy metal fenceHere’s the front ‘fancier’ part of the fence, after surviving the snowy, windy winter. I’m sad (and ashamed) to say that my gates didn’t fare as well. They were taken out, ripped off in 2 different wind storms. I don’t even have a picture of the broken pieces because I was too sad and mad to photograph the wreckage. Mean Old Mother Nature. So, now I re-engineer better, stronger gates and I’ll pray every time the wind blows that they will survive, and that I won’t ever have to rebuild them, ever again.

rusting corrugated metalThis (above) shows about 8 months of natural (no spraying with the hose) weathering. The tin isn’t weathering at all where it’s been painted.

tin ceiling tile fenceThe tin ceiling tiles are very susceptible to weather, anywhere the raw material is exposed, it rusts very quickly.

To view part 1 in 2013  look here.

To view part 3 in 2015 look here.

To view part 4 in 2018 look here.

corrugated metal fences

corrugated metal fenceMy corrugated metal fences (ceiling tiles and corrugated steel) are finished! I’ve dreamt about building one of many fancy metal fences I’ve seen before we even bought this house 3 years ago, so at long last– it’s a reality. Out of my head and into the real world.

tin ceiling tile fenceAnd the south side of the house with a plain corrugated gate. The rest of the fence, on the other 3 sides of the property, will be corrugated between wooden posts and look a lot like this, but not galvanized, although that part hasn’t been finished yet.

tin ceiling tilesIt was really hard to get a good picture of the raw ceiling tiles, they are so reflective especially in the sunlight. Here they are all laid out on the front lawn, ready to be painted.

painting tin ceiling tilesI used latex house paint, the colors of the front door, shutters and garage door among others colors I had (leftover from other house projects) and spray paint to put a base layer on the tin tiles. Once the base layer was dry, I rollered other colors over that to make the detailed relief patterns stand out.

corrugated and tin fence DIYBuilding the fence was a bit of a puzzle, without a pattern or instructions,  I had to make it up as I went along. What you can see here are the gates being pieced together. I used pressure treated 2×4’s to match the 4×4 fence posts. Within the gates and fence panels, all of the horizontal beams run the full width of the panel (secured with metal building brackets) and the vertical wood pieces are shorties placed between the horizontal sections.

corrugated and tin fence DIYHere are a few tiles painted and already in place. Instead of measuring for width and height of the individual square sections with a tape measure, I measured with an actual ceiling tile held in place, these tiles are 24″ square and conveniently very lightweight.

fence square panelsHere are the gates, on their hinges and ready for the squares to be filled.

corrugated and tin fence DIYAnd the other side coming together. All of the tin went in first and the corrugated sections I put in last. The short sections (smaller than the full 24″ square tiles) were cut with tin snips and bent to size. Really very simple- the tin was thin enough it was very easy to cut and bend.

ceiling tile fenceWorking in the cold weather actually worked out well, much better than the heat of summer, especially when it came time to cut the corrugated metal.

cutting corrugated metal I was very nervous to cut the metal, having lots of previous experience with wood working but very little with metal working, I wasn’t sure what to expect. I asked around for advice and tips, got a metal cutting blade for my circular saw, covered up every inch of skin and took a deep breath.

cutting corrugated metalA bit intimidating at first- to see sparks flying everywhere- but the preparations paid off and it was easier than I’d initially thought. Tip: stock up on saw blades, I went through 4 metal cutting blades, which quickly wear down into nubs, just in making this relatively small project.

funky metal fencePutting the panels in place, I randomly switched between vertical and horizontal placement for the corrugated sections. Luckily, I had the foresight to purchase tin snips that cut 22 gauge metal (exactly the gauge of the corrugated here). It was convenient to be able to trim corners here and there for easier fitting.
corrugated metal fence DIYTo connect the corrugated metal to the wood, I used these smaller L brackets and small bolts and nuts to secure each section into place. I secured each panel in two places and then all 4 corners on the corrugated sections of the gates.

The metal building brackets I used to connect all of the 2×4’s look like this. I chose them because they were the simplest  (and cheapest) building bracket I could find that fit the scenario. The metal brackets are about 3″ wide, I mounted them closest to the back of the fence so they be less in the way of the metal sections and less visible from the front.

drop in tin ceiling tileThis is what a drop in ceiling tile edge looks like from the front. You can see the extra material nicely provided on the edges of  drop in type ceiling tiles.

corrugated metal fence DIY With a bit of bending with needle nose pliers those section can be flattened out and used to secure the tiles in place by providing about an inch of material to screw through.

corrugated metal fenceThe brackets here and there definitely give it an industrial look, but I think the process evident aspect adds to the charm.

corrugated metal fence backHere is what the back of the gates look like, a good view of the raw tin. I didn’t even occur to me to worry about what the back would look like. I think it’s kinda of a two-fer  have it look funky from both sides. The naked tin is very reflective in bright sunlight and I think I’ll paint the back like I did the front sides, in the spring.

corrugated metal fence gateI went a little crazy on the hardware trying to make my gates the squarest, non-saggyest gates ever. So far- I’m very disappointed in the wheels from Home Depot, there isn’t enough travel to keep them on the ground when the gates are all the way open and then they bump against  the wood when they are all the way closed and won’t even roll which leads to a lot of forcing which I do not appreciate. Also, I realize my gate tension system is backwards, I did this on purpose because the wood was beginning to bend forward at the top of one of the gates and I had to nip it in the bud. I think I will add another to criss cross (the right way) for actual support.

corrugated metal fence backHere is the back of the fence on the other side of the house, and our grow boxes all ready for spring.

I loved sharing this project with you! If you have any questions or comments, need details or encouragement please don’t hesitate to ask. I would love to help.

To view the fence and rusting process a year later in 2014, look here.

To view the fence and yard after 2 years in 2015, look here.

To view the fence and yard in 2018, look here.