corrugated metal fence

corrugated metal fence update part 4

corrugated metal fenceHello everyone, here’s a summertime update of my corrugated metal fence built in 2013. The front of the fence includes tin ceiling tiles (purchased new and painted) and corrugated steel cut to fit into the fence in squares. The other three sides are sheets of corrugated metal. The whole fence has redwood posts and rails.
corrugated metal fenceThe aging process has been fun to watch, water in the form of rain, snow and sprinklers has brought out the rust in pleasing ways.

corrugated metal fence

corrugated metal fence

backyard shipping containerMy kids have added a skate ramp, just inside the gate, basically covering up one of my gate doors.

corrugated metal fence
metal ceiling tile fenceIn any spot where the paint has chipped off the ceiling tiles, the rusting process begins immediately (see above picture). Good thing I like the rusty, aged look.
corrugated metal fenceThe tin ceiling tiles began to rust immediately, the corrugated steel has taken much longer. It’s barely rusted at all in areas where very little water hits the fence.

The wood has been stained 3 times over the years, at the rate of about every other year. If you looks closely, you can see where the metal close to the wood is less rusty and has been protected by the stain applied hurriedly by indentured, distracted, yet hard working teens.
corrugated metal fenceI’ve always planned to make a tiny door for this opening within the big gate. It’s been low priority since we don’t have an animals that need to be contained, and as you can see-  it’s still yet to be built.
metal ceiling tile fence After the gates were trashed in a wind storm (heavy winds happen frequently) I added the metal strapping to the backside of the gates. Best idea ever. The strapping saved the day, the gates are holding up great now. The only true weathering or warping is happening with the wooden elements.  We don’t open the gates very often (2-3 times a summer) which probably helps keep them strong. When the gates are open, for as short a time as possible, we prop them up on blocks to support them on the sloping driveway.

backyard shipping containerWe put a shipping container in the side yard for storage, hanging out or both. It goes well with the metal fence surrounding it. We love the aesthetic and the extra space.
corrugated metal fence
<a href="http://noelleodesigns.com/?attachment_id=9853" rel="attachment wp-att-9853"><img class="aligncenter size-large wp-image-9853" src="http://noelleodesigns.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/IMG_2554-1024x768.jpg" alt="backyard shipping container" width="625" height="469" /></a>We put a shipping container in the side yard for storage, hanging out or both. It goes well with the metal fence surrounding it. We love the aesthetic and the extra space.
corrugated metal fenceIn the other corner of the yard we put in a wooden pergola. Originally, there was a beautiful mountain view from this corner but then a neighboring house went in and blocked that view. The new house also blocks the strong winds that come from that direction. And the neighbors are really great, so we’ll take the trade off.

corrugated metal fencecorrugated metal fence
corrugated metal fence Even in the 5 years or so the metal has been exposed to the elements, very little rust shows in the areas not directly hit by the sprinklers, like this pergola corner.
corrugated metal fenceTo the right of the baby, follow the gravel path past the shed to the garden area on the south side of the house.
corrugated metal fenceOn the south side of the house are the raised beds garden spot. Corrugated plastic panels on two sections help let more light in.
corrugated metal fenceAs you can see, the non-painted sides of the tiles are very rusted. It will eventually rust through, much quicker (maybe 10 years)  than the corrugated metal (maybe 100 years). The galvanized metal hardware is still looking good.
corrugated metal fenceI was very skeptical about this corrugated plastic. I had nightmares of it turning yellow and breaking like I’ve remembered seeing at elderly houses throughout my life. But I really wanted as much sunlight as possible in this garden area. Since it’s basically invisible to both our neighbors and ourselves, no one spends time or is worried about the ‘look’ of things on this side of the house, we decided to go with the clear, weird corrugated plastic. As you can see- no yellow, no breaks and the garden grows well- I would do it again!
corrugated metal fenceThe tin ceiling tiles I bought had an extra flange on all sides. This worked in my favor as I bent them in on all sides and screwed right through the flange into the wood to hold the tiles in place. The tin tiles are also easy to cut and bend for fitting in smaller areas.

corrugated metal fenceThe view from the front of the house, on the garden side. As you can see, the only real wear is with the wood elements. Even with the treated redwood I hand-selected, there is still warping and twisting of the wood elements. That’s the nature of wood. As you can see, we wedged a 2 x 4 above the gate to keep the post on the right to keep from bending in, the wedged piece of wood has never fallen out.

corrugated metal fence corrugated metal fence corrugated metal fence

To view the building of the fence in 2013- Part 1.

To view the 2014 fence update- Part 2.

To view the 2015 fence update- Part 3.

Repurposed vintage towels

up cycled vintage towelsvintage towels DIYDuring a major cleaning phase, a friend passed along a whole stack of very stylish vintage towels she had been collecting over the years. I thought long and hard about what could be done with these towels, to maximum effect.  The size of vintage towels is a tricky business. Too small to wrap around most people and comfortably cover all after a bath or shower. Too big to be used as a hand towel. They could be individually spread out throughout the bathrooms in the house for display only, hung up or stacked on shelves.

Then, it hit me- the easiest upcycle job ever- they would make perfect oversized beach towels!
repurposed vintage towelsBasically the easiest project ever- after you’ve collected the materials. Line the towels up in the color and pattern combos you prefer. Look closely before you sew them together, there is definitely a front and a back on most towels.

Most of the towels lined up to be close enough in size to sew right together. Trim and hem the vintage towels that are too long to fit next to the other towels.

repurposed vintage towels
The repurposed vintage towels have definitely become a family favorite. Excellent for laying on  in the sun. Perfect for covering up when you’ve had enough sun for the day.
repurposed vintage towelsSo now you’ve got a great reason to go thrifting! Stand out in all the right ways at the beach, lake, concert in the park or picnic with your up-cycle savvy vintage towel brilliance. And it’s absolutely the easiest DIY sewing project you’ll ever tackle.

Experimental quilting- work in progress

Noelle Olpin

An experiment in every way.

I’ve had this idea rolling around in my head and in my dreams for a while now. With a bit of stolen time each day, I started dyeing fabric with coffee and tea, cutting without a straight edge, stitching blocks and washing fabrics and then arranging blocks.

Noelle Olpin

Then, making up the design and mapping all the blocks together.

No Rules Quilting, as I’ve come to think of it, is harder than you might think. It’s experimental quilting and you can’t do anything wrong, ever. Which is a relief and also a burden.

When there isn’t any one telling you what to do, no rules or steps to follow, the process can be exhausting. A constant mental battle on what you’ve been taught and know to be accepted (no exposed edges or uncut thread ends) within in the quilting/sewing communities and the beauty of irregularity, imperfection and what some might think of as a big mess.

Noelle Olpin

I like the result so much, I’m willing to toss all the rules aside and see what shakes down.

noelle olpin

At this point, the project slows down. The piecing work has been done on a sewing machine so far. I have plans for slow stitching- hand stitching the finish work. I love the look of Kantha quilting, so a lot of that look will be involved.

Noelle Olpin Noelle Olpin Noelle OlpinI’ve been attempting to let the ideas flow for finishing the edges on this experimental quilt. The project isn’t very big, a wall hanging size in fact (22″ x24″).

Perhaps a traditional binding, maybe not? A frame with the quilt stretched across the inside like an animal skin? Hung from a stick with loops? Stapled to the wall?  We shall see…

Now, I carry this project with me wherever I go. Because the beauty of hand stitching is that you can do it anywhere and everywhere. And that’s what audiobooks are for…

Have a wonderful day!