Tag Archives: DIY

Pilgrim Bonnet Sewing Pattern

 make an easy pilgrim bonnet

This DIY- pilgrim bonnet sewing pattern takes no time at all. The size works for an adult or a child and can be reused over and over unlike a paper bonnet. It could be just the thing to ease family tension around the Thanksgiving table this holiday season or make your little pilgrims stand out in their school Thanksgiving performance.  Be sure to check out my Native American Indian vest and Native American Indian headband tutorials too and you’ll have a costume for everyone this November.

pilgrim bonnet sewing pattern

I came across this fantastic Simplicity pattern from 1970 in my collection and thought I would share the pilgrim bonnet sewing pattern.  It has a lovely traditional shape and design to it, perfect for costuming a pilgrim or pioneer.  The pattern says child size 6 but we found it fits a medium size adult head as well.  Read through all instructions before you begin. There are two pattern pieces you will need, the crown and the brim.

Pilgrim bonnet sewing pattern:

pilgrim bonnet sewing patternOn a piece of paper, draw the pattern for the crown. Draw a rectangle 9 inches tall and 4 1/2 inches wide. Round the corners of your drawing to match the picture above. Cut out your crown pattern piece copying over all instructions, especially “center back, place line on fold of fabric”. Place pattern over your folded over fabric and cut to size.
make an easy pilgrim bonnetMake sure you cut the crown piece on a fold so your crown piece will look like the above picture.
make an easy pilgrim bonnetFor the brim, draw a rectangle 20 inches long by 9 inches wide. Draw in the corners and darts to match the pattern above. Make sure to transfer all markings to your pattern piece. Place your pattern piece over your 2 pieces of fabric and cut them out.
pilgrim bonnet sewing patternCut a piece of interfacing slightly smaller than the brim pattern to go between the two brim layers and stiffen up the fabric.

Crown:
pilgrim bonnet sewing pattern

Press under 1/4 inch on lower edge of crown.

 

pilgrim bonnet sewing patternTurn lower edge to inside along seam line, forming casing. Stitch close to inner edge.
pilgrim bonnet sewing pattern

Cut a piece of elastic 4-5 inches long.

 

pilgrim bonnet sewing patternUsing a safety pin, slip elastic thru casing; stitch ends.
make an easy pilgrim bonnetStitch the ends of the elastic to casing on either side of the crown.

Brim:
pilgrim bonnet sewing pattern

Iron interfacing to WRONG side of one brim piece. Mark dart lines in brim, both sides.
pilgrim bonnet sewing patternMatching dots, sew darts in brim facing.
pilgrim bonnet sewing pattern

Repeat steps on the other non-interfaced brim piece. With the iron, press the darts flat.

pilgrim bonnet sewing pattern
pilgrim bonnet sewing patternWith the RIGHT sides together, stitch facing to brim, leaving notched edges open. Trim corners and clip inside curves to ease fabric when turned right side out.
pilgrim bonnet sewing patternTurn RIGHT side out; press.
pilgrim bonnet sewing patternPress under 5/8 inch on notch edge of brim facing.

Stitching crown to brim:
make an easy pilgrim bonnetWith right sides together, pin crown to brim, matching centers.

 make a pilgrim bonnet

Stitch facing to brim being careful not to catch in brim facing as you sew.  Remove pins as you go, before you sew over them.

 

make an easy pilgrim bonnetThe bonnet is all sewn together and ready for the final steps.
make an easy pilgrim bonnet

Pin the edge of pressed brim facing over seam. Slip stitch or machine stitch into place.

Finishing:

make an easy pilgrim bonnetTurn bonnet RIGHT side out, fold brim over.  Cut two lengths of ribbon.
make a pilgrim bonnet

Sew one end of each ribbon to brim, sewing them at darts as shown.

corrugated metal fence update

corrugated metal fenceThe backyard progress, part 3– the back 3 sides of my corrugated metal fence are now finally finished.

backyard shipping containerThe shipping container is also in place but yet to be cut into to add doors and windows.

corrugated metal fenceThe fence was build with wooden posts, 8 ft. apart, set directly into concrete. Wooden rails are held between the posts, with metal building brackets.

corrugated metal fenceThe metal we used is non-galvanized corrugated metal. Non-galvanized  meaning it will rust and with a thickness of 26 gauge. It’s actually more expensive than galvanized (won’t rust) corrugated metal which is 22 gauge, thinner, and flimsier. The galvanized seemed very shiny, reflective and contrived, if that makes sense. I was told you can remove the galvanized layer with music acid, and allow it to rust, but due to the thin-ness of the material, it will rust all the way through in about 10 years. We decided it was worth the extra expense to go with the non galvanized metal and get the rusty, organic look.

metal fence, wood postsI like the look of the wood with the metal so I built the fence with the rails on the inside. We just stained the wood and it looks even nicer. I think it will look even better as the fence starts to rust.

metal fence, wood postsThese corrugated panels have been up for about 3 months and have just barely begun to rust. I did spray the entire fence with the hose, about a week ago, with the hope of speeding up the rusting process, but honestly I’m enjoying the way it looks now.

corrugated fenceJust the beginnings of rust starting to show, after a few rain storms and a spraying with the hose.

tiny door in metal fenceOn the back corner of the fence, where the kid traffic is the heaviest, we have left a tiny door panel. I have a door (piece of corrugated) made for it but haven’t gotten it put up yet. It will be hinged into the post and on a spring so it stays closed when not in use.  Also, you can see the overlapping of the panels. Each 8 ft. section took 3 pieces of corrugated, instead of cutting them to width, I just let the panels overlap each other and screwed them into the rails, with a pilot hole, and 1 5/8″ sheet metal screws.

tin ceiling tile metal fenceOn the south side of the house, the space was fairly narrow, I put in raised beds but the beds were going to be too close to the fence to get enough sunlight to grow vegetables. After puzzling it over for months, I decided to put up clear corrugated plastic panels to let enough light through to keep my vegetables growing. These improved plastic panels shouldn’t get brittle and weird yellow like the plastic you remember on your grandma’s greenhouse.

raised garden bedsThe view from the front yard, looking through the gate and into the garden area.

tin ceiling tile fence, backThe backside of the fancy fence panel, the tin is quite rusty after 8 months of exposure.

clear garden, metal fenceThe view from the sidewalk, across the empty neighboring lot.

corrugated metal fenceHere is what the fence looks like from the outside, only the posts are visible from this view. You can see the retaining wall that we put in to maximize space and flatten out the backyard.

garden backyard areaThe garden beds from the inside of the fence, as you can see there’s a lot more light with the clear panels than there would be with metal in place. Also, you can see the backside weathering of the tin and corrugated panels from the fancy  front-of-the-house part of the fence. Pause and take a nostalgic glimpse at our art covered garden fence at our previous house.

clear garden fenceThe tin ceiling tiles rusted a lot faster than the corrugated, I’m loving the backside non-painted look.

fancy metal fence, backThe corrugated is rusting much slower, taking it’s time in the weathering process, but it’s a nice contrast.

fancy metal fenceHere’s the front ‘fancier’ part of the fence, after surviving the snowy, windy winter. I’m sad (and ashamed) to say that my gates didn’t fare as well. They were taken out, ripped off in 2 different wind storms. I don’t even have a picture of the broken pieces because I was too sad and mad to photograph the wreckage. Mean Old Mother Nature. So, now I re-engineer better, stronger gates and I’ll pray every time the wind blows that they will survive, and that I won’t ever have to rebuild them, ever again.

rusting corrugated metalThis (above) shows about 8 months of natural (no spraying with the hose) weathering. The tin isn’t weathering at all where it’s been painted.

tin ceiling tile fenceThe tin ceiling tiles are very susceptible to weather, anywhere the raw material is exposed, it rusts very quickly.

To view part 1 look here.

how to make drawstring backpacks

Hello and happy 2014! Sorry about my missing-in-action status but it was a crazy month with sewing, Beehive Bazaaring, skiing, holiday festivities and now cleaning and organizing for the new year.
In the midst of the madness I managed to sneak in teaching a video class for Atly on how to make my drawstring backpacks. drawstring backpacks
Here’s a bit about Atly, in case you don’t already know, it’s a fantastic website or forum for expanding your horizons and skills, learning something new with beautiful video classes on all kinds of topics (and upgrade possibilities within the classes for personal instructor feedback.) No dark, obscure YouTube tutorials shot in dirty houses that you realize aren’t really what you needed to know after painfully watching and waiting for way too long. …this may have happened to me once or twice… Just straightforward, visually motivating, well-done classes.
The great part of this class is learning the EASY WAY to put in a zipper and how to install grommets for connecting the handles. So, without further ado, here a link to my drawstring backpack class.

If you need some inspiration for fabrics and backpack designs, here are a few more backpacks I’ve sewn up.