Category Archives: design

corrugated metal fence update

corrugated metal fenceThe backyard progress, part 3– the back 3 sides of my corrugated metal fence are now finally finished.

backyard shipping containerThe shipping container is also in place but yet to be cut into to add doors and windows.

corrugated metal fenceThe fence was build with wooden posts, 8 ft. apart, set directly into concrete. Wooden rails are held between the posts, with metal building brackets.

corrugated metal fenceThe metal we used is non-galvanized corrugated metal. Non-galvanized  meaning it will rust and with a thickness of 26 gauge. It’s actually more expensive than galvanized (won’t rust) corrugated metal which is 22 gauge, thinner, and flimsier. The galvanized seemed very shiny, reflective and contrived, if that makes sense. I was told you can remove the galvanized layer with music acid, and allow it to rust, but due to the thin-ness of the material, it will rust all the way through in about 10 years. We decided it was worth the extra expense to go with the non galvanized metal and get the rusty, organic look.

metal fence, wood postsI like the look of the wood with the metal so I built the fence with the rails on the inside. We just stained the wood and it looks even nicer. I think it will look even better as the fence starts to rust.

metal fence, wood postsThese corrugated panels have been up for about 3 months and have just barely begun to rust. I did spray the entire fence with the hose, about a week ago, with the hope of speeding up the rusting process, but honestly I’m enjoying the way it looks now.

corrugated fenceJust the beginnings of rust starting to show, after a few rain storms and a spraying with the hose.

tiny door in metal fenceOn the back corner of the fence, where the kid traffic is the heaviest, we have left a tiny door panel. I have a door (piece of corrugated) made for it but haven’t gotten it put up yet. It will be hinged into the post and on a spring so it stays closed when not in use.  Also, you can see the overlapping of the panels. Each 8 ft. section took 3 pieces of corrugated, instead of cutting them to width, I just let the panels overlap each other and screwed them into the rails, with a pilot hole, and 1 5/8″ sheet metal screws.

tin ceiling tile metal fenceOn the south side of the house, the space was fairly narrow, I put in raised beds but the beds were going to be too close to the fence to get enough sunlight to grow vegetables. After puzzling it over for months, I decided to put up clear corrugated plastic panels to let enough light through to keep my vegetables growing. These improved plastic panels shouldn’t get brittle and try yellow like the plastic you remember on your grandma’s greenhouse.

raised garden bedsThe view from the front yard, looking through the gate and into the garden area.

tin ceiling tile fence, backThe backside of the fancy fence panel, the tin is quite rusty after 8 months of exposure.

clear garden, metal fenceThe view from the sidewalk, across the empty neighboring lot.

corrugated metal fenceHere is what the fence looks like from the outside, only the posts are visible from this view. You can see the retaining wall that we put in to maximize space and flatten out the backyard.

garden backyard areaThe garden beds from the inside of the fence, as you can see there’s a lot more light with the clear panels than there would be with metal in place. Also, you can see the backside weathering of the tin and corrugated panels from the fancy  front-of-the-house part of the fence.

clear garden fenceThe tin ceiling tiles rusted a lot faster than the corrugated, I’m loving the backside non-painted look.

fancy metal fence, backThe corrugated is rusting much slower, taking it’s time in the weathering process, but it’s a nice contrast.

fancy metal fenceHere’s the front ‘fancier’ part of the fence, after surviving the snowy, windy winter. I’m sad (and ashamed) to say that my gates didn’t fare as well. They were taken out, ripped off in 2 different wind storms. I don’t even have a picture of the broken pieces because I was too sad and mad to photograph the wreckage. Mean Old Mother Nature. So, now I re-engineer better, stronger gates and I’ll pray every time the wind blows that they will survive, and that I won’t ever have to rebuild them, ever again.

rusting corrugated metalThis (above) shows about 8 months of natural (no spraying with the hose) weathering. The tin isn’t weathering at all where it’s been painted.

tin ceiling tile fenceThe tin ceiling tiles are very susceptible to weather, anywhere the raw material is exposed, it rusts very quickly.

To view part 1 look here.

an experiment in abstract quilting

mountain quilt 1The Big Rock Candy Mountain quilt is finished- all quilted and bound! As with most projects, the first step is the hardest and that was definitely true in this case. Working without a pattern requires a huge mental effort and so I must admit I walked away from this project for months at a time because I was having a hard time seeing the big, final picture. But all the hard work in abstract quilting was so extremely rewarding, and now, I think I’m hooked.
mountain quilt backFabric with assorted keys on the back, a panel from Urban Outfitters I found a few years back.
big rock candy mt quiltThe quilting was done by Corn Wagon Quilt Company in Springville UT. They have done custom work (freehand by the human operator, not a computer programmed stitch) for me before so I trusted they would do a good job again. I was very undecided on how to quilt this project. I went back and forth on various ideas, asking everyone’s opinion and you can see what won out- based on majority rule. I had Van Gogh’s Starry, Starry Night pictured in my minds eye when I saw the background. I had pictured swirls bigger than these but I didn’t specify exact size and I think these smaller swirls suit just fine.
big rock candy mountain quiltThere are a few stars in the sky- I had pictured more but I think it works out just fine. Someday I’ll have my own long arm quilting machine and I’ll be free to quilt whatever I can dream up (after hours and months of lessons, practice and messing up I’m sure).
triangle pieced quiltI love the way the straight stitches on the mountain really make the points and geometry stand out. Very simple- in a good way.
backlight quiltBacklit and blowing in the wind, it took me about 5 minutes with the camera poised and ready to get this picture. The wind was making it flap and twist, but I had to get at least one good picture with the mountains in the background and the sunlight coming through the fabric.
keys on the backsideI learned from my mother-in-law to always title, sign and date a quilt. Here is one way- just a corner of muslin or plain white fabric in the back corner, hand stitched on, for the important details. This location works well because you can easily flip the bottom corner over for the details without taking the quilt down off the wall. (And I’d better not forget to sign it…)
hanging a quiltIf the quilt is meant to hang on the wall, include a sleeve at the top when stitching the binding on. About 2 or 3 inches wide across the top should suffice. This picture is actually a great bad example of what to use when hanging the quilt. I’ve got a very bendy piece of wood that is twisting and turning (as you can see) and not allowing the quilt to hang nicely flat against the wall. Chose a strong, flat and thin piece of wood for hanging and there will be minimal to no sag over the years.
quilting from the backA view of how the quilting stitching looks against the keys on the back.
folded quilt
mountain quilt with timpOne last look, with my neighboring mountains before this quilt goes off to it’s new home. it’s going to artist Colt Bowden and growing family. It’s going to be tough to say goodbye. (I might have to make another one for me).

For a look at this quilt in the piecing triangles process look here.

handmade purses and bags

I’ve been designing and working on some handmade purses and bags of the messenger variety this winter with some fabulous fabrics I’ve recently picked up in LA- new and vintage loveliness I couldn’t live without. Here are a few from the current batch or maybe I should say Winter 2014 Collection.ruffle flap purseThis bag has an easy-access-but-delightfully-subtle cell phone pocket just under the flap- bonus.
blue vinyl messenger bagBlue vinyl messenger bag- shiny and matte vinyl combos on the outside and oodles of pockets inside and out. There’s even a waist strap (for cyclists) that’s stowable when not in use.
appliqué flowers, red messenger bagApplique flowers in cottons and wool felt on a heavy weight woven red messenger bag.
noelle o designs pursesAnd a few more bags of various styles… I regret The Collection isn’t listed on Etsy  -yet-  BUT all of these bags and more will be at Art Market in Salt Lake City Utah this weekend, February 7-8th. Stop by if you’re in the area.
Utah art market